Abyss

This remarkable feat of engineering extended the brick ceiling of a gallery in Turin’s Castello di Rivoli nearly to the floor, creating an oppressive environment.

Abyss View larger

Brick, concrete, steel, and epoxy resin
173⅝ × 545⅝ × 639⅜ in. (441 × 1386 × 1624 cm)
Installation view, T1 Triennial of Contemporary Art, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin, 2005
Photo: Paolo Pellion

Abyss View larger

Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin

Abyss View larger

Brick, concrete, steel, and epoxy resin
173⅝ × 545⅝ × 639⅜ in. (441 × 1386 × 1624 cm)
Installation view, T1 Triennial of Contemporary Art, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin, 2005

Abyss View larger

Brick, concrete, steel, and epoxy resin
173⅝ × 545⅝ × 639⅜ in. (441 × 1386 × 1624 cm)
Installation view, T1 Triennial of Contemporary Art, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin, 2005

Abyss View larger

Brick, concrete, steel, and epoxy resin
173⅝ × 545⅝ × 639⅜ in. (441 × 1386 × 1624 cm)
Installation view, T1 Triennial of Contemporary Art, Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin, 2005

“The history of this castle is very important because this monarchy was poor and they built with bricks. When you enter that space your first impression is one of oppression, the weight of the brick vault on your head.”
—Carlos Granada
Interview with MCA Chicago

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