Untitled

Salcedo completed three public interventions in the streets of Bogotá following the murder of popular political satirist Jaime Garzón on August 13, 1999.

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 1999

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 1999

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 1999

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 1999
Photo courtesy of El Espectador, Bogotá

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

“A year after he was killed I made a piece with his brother and his sister and I provided them with roses that were tied together, so the idea was to draw a long line of roses from his house to the point where he was killed, four-and-a-half kilometers away. It took us all day, it was very slow, a really solemn act.”
—Doris Salcedo
Interview with MCA Chicago

View excerpt

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

Untitled View larger

Roses
Dimensions variable
Site-specific work, Bogotá, 2000

“Time—the ephemerality of the project itself, how roses are alive and they wilt—the poetry of that is definitely there, but also the universal symbol of a rose as an offering to someone, normally, an offering of love.”
—Julie Rodrigues Widholm
Interview with MCA Chicago

View excerpt